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The Milanese brand La Double J. has collaborated with Kartell for the first time producing a collection of curated pieces from the Kartell archives, including classic seating, soft furnishing and storage, plus new table top items that mix La Double J.’s signature vintage prints with Kartell’s 70-year design legacy.

La Double J. was founded in 2015 by Los Angeles-born, Milan-based journalist and vintage collector J.J. Martin, this is her first collection with Kartell.

La Double J. was founded in 2015 by Los Angeles-born, Milan-based journalist and vintage collector J.J. Martin, this is her first collection with Kartell.

La Double J. was founded in 2015 by Los Angeles-born, Milan-based journalist and vintage collector J.J. Martin who has had her eye on the hidden pattern archives of Italy. What started with a one-off idea to explore the historic Mantero Silk Archive, the project grew to include what she describes as the under-the-radar pieces, historical producers and archival prints.

“The idea for La Double J. is to always partner with the very best of Made in Italy whether we’re making silk dresses or porcelain plates. When it came to our first foray into furniture, Kartell was our top choice. Working with Lorenza Luti was an absolute pleasure and her family’s iconic furniture is the perfect home for our vintage prints.”

Furniture is the centerpoint of the new Kartell collaboration, with each piece in the La Double J. collection transformed with vivacious vintage prints sourced from the Italian archives of Mantero Seta, one of Lake Como’s oldest silk manufacturers.

Here Patricia Urquiola’s Clap chair is wrapped in prints including Geometrico, Olive and Picnic. The Olive vintage pattern was originally designed in the 1920s by the leading Paris-based textile maison J. Claude Frères et Cie which was founded by brothers Francois and Victor Jean-Claude Frères in the 1830s.

The collection extends to the Trix sofa by Piero Lissoni, now reupholstered in Ninfea and Tulipani prints. The iconic stackable plastic storage system, Componibili, by Kartell founder Anna Castelli Ferrieri, is relaunched as a smaller two-story piece printed in Ninfea print, while the larger three-storey version is now finished in cream with the Ninfea print on the sliding panels and top.

The Ninfea print is sourced from the Mantero archives. It was designed in the 1920s by Wallach, a French print company in business from 1860 to 1925, which produced volumes of hand-drawn and hand-painted designs on paper to be printed on fabric.

The Ninfea print is sourced from the Mantero archives. It was designed in the 1920s by Wallach, a French print company in business from 1860 to 1925, which produced volumes of hand-drawn and hand-painted designs on paper to be printed on fabric.

“The idea for La Double J. is to always partner with the very best of Made in Italy whether we’re making silk dresses or porcelain plates. When it came to our first foray into furniture, Kartell was our top choice. Working with Lorenza Luti was an absolute pleasure and her family’s iconic furniture is the perfect home for our vintage prints.”
— J. J. Martin, Founder La Double J.
The Componibili by Kartell founder Anna Castelli Ferrieri is relaunched as a smaller two-story piece printed in Ninfea, Geometrica and Galletti prints. The Galletti vintage pattern originally designed in the 1970s was sourced from the Italian archives of Mantero Seta, one of Lake Como’s oldest silk manufacturers.

The Componibili by Kartell founder Anna Castelli Ferrieri is relaunched as a smaller two-story piece printed in Ninfea, Geometrica and Galletti prints. The Galletti vintage pattern originally designed in the 1970s was sourced from the Italian archives of Mantero Seta, one of Lake Como’s oldest silk manufacturers.

The Madame chair by Philippe Starck is reimagined in four prints – .Ruote, Uccellini Blu, Galletti and Lilium. The Ruote pattern hails from the archives of Zurich-based Abraham silk, the manufacturers behind Dior’s New Look collection that blasted Europe with colour after WWII.

The Madame chair by Philippe Starck is reimagined in four prints – .Ruote, Uccellini Blu, Galletti and Lilium. The Ruote pattern hails from the archives of Zurich-based Abraham silk, the manufacturers behind Dior’s New Look collection that blasted Europe with colour after WWII.

Philippe Starck’s famous Madame Chair has been upholstered in a number of vintage prints – Lilium, designed in the 1990s, Uccellini Blu from the 1940s, Ruote from the 1980s and the rooster-patterned Galletti. Uccellini Blu was originally created by the Paris-based fabric designer Suzanne Kientz, well known for making collages in the process, often using paper, crayons, gouache, and ink.

Of particular note is the re-emergence of Kartell’s ground-breaking Joe Colombo chair 4801 designed in 1965 by the acclaimed architect and designer whose interest in plastics took interiors and furniture to new dizzying highest in the 60s. Back in the collection for the first time in years, it has been reimagined in opaque plastic with the option of cushions in Geometric print designed in the 70s by the Como based textile designer Sergio Bini. A long time point of reference for European and Italian designers, Karl Lagerfeld and Gianni Versace, the relaunch of key pieces from the Kartell Collection are also way to re-visit Italy’s rich textile history in collaboration with J. J. Martin, Milan’s most exuberant textile muses.

Kartell is available exclusively in South East Asia from Space – Australia – and Space – Asia.

Kartell is available exclusively in South East Asia from Space – Australia – and Space – Asia.

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