Edra Favela chairs by the Campana Brothers

Edra Favela chairs by the Campana Brothers

Cofounder of São Paulo-based design collective Estudio Campana, Humberto Campana has a passion for the traditions of Brazilian craftsmanship making his country’s eclectic traditions the starting point for the studio’s prized collections – like the Vermelha chair made of 500 metres of rope that launched his career nearly 20 years ago.

Along with his brother Fernando Campana and a team of artists, seamstresses, designers and craftspeople, Humberto Campana has established an international reputation for contemporary design that focuses on simple, everyday materials, reimagined and magically transformed into beautiful pieces that boldly and successfully bridge artistic endeavour and functional design.

We try to humanise design by working with communities of artisans to recover traditions that are disappearing and to produce not only pieces of contemporary design but also income and recognition for these communities.
— Humberto Campana, Adelaide Review
The Edra Vermehla chair is part of MoMA New York's permanent collection.

The Edra Vermehla chair is part of MoMA New York's permanent collection.

Five hundred metres of rope was the starting point for one of their most famous pieces the Vermehla chair. A piece that also began a 20-year collaboration with Italian manufacturer Edra. Now like many of their designs Vermelha is part of MoMA New York’s permanent object collection.

Also of note are pieces including the Favela chair that shares the tradition of make-shift Brazilian architecture, the coral-inspired Corallo armchair, the large and enveloping Boa sofa, the Campana lamp and Cipria sofa, a series of floating fluffy ‘powder puffs’. All pieces explore texture, material, colour, and Estudio Campana’s unique processes in experimentation and making things by hand.

Humberto Campana was in Australia this month as a keynote speaker at the APSDA 2015 conference in Adelaide.

You can read the recent interview with Humberto Campana in The Adelaide Review.


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