In a recent article in The New York Times T Magazine, writer Tom Delavan takes us inside the home of one of the design world's most interesting Modernist architects. The Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen is known for rigorous, spare design that retains a sense of life. Captivated by a once-stately house in Antwerp, he distilled it to its elements — and made it his home.

Every day, on his way to his studio not far from the center of Antwerp, the architect Vincent Van Duysen would pass by a stately 19th-century building. Unlike most of the narrow brick structures commonly found in his native Belgium, it had an expansive white facade with large neo-Classical windows. Although it was clear to Van Duysen that the structure had good bones, it was shrouded in graffiti and neglect. One day he noticed that the house seemed to be unoccupied; he made some inquiries and discovered that the house was for sale, and for a surprisingly reasonable price. Continues...

 

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