In The New York Times, writer Pilar Viladas meets Kartell's Claudio Luti and his wife Maria–whose father Giulio Castelli founded the company in 1949–for a tour of their Liberty-style house that blends new and old within its richly layered interiors. You can’t be modern if you don’t know the past. Innovation doesn’t happen in a vacuum; you need to know the history of what came before. This is true in architecture, decorating and furniture design. And it’s evident in the interiors of the Milan town house designed by Studio Peregalli for Claudio Luti, the C.E.O. of the Italian furniture company Kartell, and his wife, Maria. Kartell was founded in 1949 by Maria’s father, Giulio Castelli, a chemical engineer. Maria’s mother, Anna Castelli Ferrieri, was an architect who designed numerous products for the company, which was and still is a pioneer in sleek, contemporary plastic furniture. But the Lutis don’t live in a modern structure; instead, their house is a richly textured, densely layered composition of interpretations of history, rather than direct references to it. “It’s a funny situation that someone who makes that kind of furniture has a house like this,” Roberto Peregalli remarked. But modern references abound, in the form of numerous pieces from Kartell, ingeniously placed throughout the house, which demonstrate that the present is just the latest point on a continuum. Continues...

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